Tuesdays with Morrie
by Jeffery Hatcher and Mitch Albom, based on the book by Mitch Albom

March 10 - April 3, 2011

TICKETS
Regular Price Th/Sun - $18; Fri/Sat - $20
Senior Price - $16
Student Price - $15
Rush (Half Hour Prior to Show) - $15
Thrifty Thursdays (3/10, 3/31) - $10

SHOWTIMES

Click the calendar below for specific dates and show times.

THEATER
Furlan Auditorium
Seating Chart

 

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Mitch Albom's best-selling novel is brought to life in this magical theatrical tale of a special life-affirming friendship. Based on the funny and feisty lessons Albom experienced while visiting his college sociology professor Morrie Schwartz during the final stages of the older man's struggles with Lou Gehrig's disease, this is a story that reminds audiences that we all may choose to love and be loved every day we are blessed with the glorious gift of life.

Preview March 10; Opening Night March 11

The Sunset Playhouse is teaming up with Elm Grove's innovative The Dooryard Gallery to present: Visual Short Stories: Vintage Paintings by Janet Roberts from March 11-April 3. (Special Artist Reception on Friday, March 11, 2011).

This special artistic collaboration will premiere with a free-of-charge artist reception on Friday, March 11 from 5:30pm-7:00pm. Patrons will be able to meet the artist during this special event and mix and mingle over art, lively discussion, light refreshments and a glass of wine. Ms. Robert’s work will then be showcased in the lobby at Sunset Playhouse during the entire performance run of TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE (March 11- April 3).

 

Morrie was Superb!

I listen to theis story as a book on tape and thought the guys did an excellent job. Brought back a lot of feelings and thoughts I'd forgotten about life. We had a most excellent evening, Thanks!


 

Wonderful!

Marvelous acting! Could not help but get teary eyed during some of the scenes. I thought both actors did a wonderful job.


 

Preview night of Tuesdays with Morrie

The story spans twenty years and does a bit of jumping around at first, but was easy to follow with clear monologue from the characters about when events are taking place. The storyline quickly settles into chronological order with only one flashback. It was a great mix of seriousness broken by comedic moments that helped to lend truth to the message of the story. The storyline was a great one, and very worthwhile to connect with through this play; of experiencing life and not taking it for granted. With only two characters, Mitch played by Stephan Roselin and Morrie played by Don Devona, the audience was really able to immerse themselves in the relationship that is central to the story between the two. Stephan performed the part of Mitch well; I felt he did an excellent job moving between the eras we saw his character in. He changed his posture and attitude to reflect the age his character was which enhanced the lines he delivered and created a believable character. Don played the kindhearted Morrie to a “t” this play would not have been the same without his engrossment in the wise, funny, and lovable professor. I believe playing the role of Morrie with another theatre in a past production of this same play may have had a great deal to do with his ease in playing this character. The two actors created together a feeling of friendship and love that was so true I couldn’t help but smile, laugh, and cry along with them. The message of the play is a centuries old one, told in a story based on true life of not taking our life for granted. We are all living and we are all going to die at some point. This story takes us on a journey of how one man lived a rich life, and a student he touched and taught how to do the same and reminded him of how from his death bed. Morrie’s shared wisdom, and Mitch’s life mistakes and struggles are a realistic reminder to live life to the fullest, not for possessions or money but to make memories and do worthwhile things. The play was easy to get wrapped up in with good conversations and witty remarks that advanced the plot. It was enjoyable to watch Stephan (playing Mitch) change his tone and language to reveal when he was playing a young college student. The most memorable line from the play was in Yiddish, told to us twice and finally translated to “Don’t hide your light under a bushel.” I felt this was a great summary for the whole message in the play and delivered in a way that was noteworth and fun. The set was simple, with multiple levels I felt were well used. In the intimate auditorium I can imagine it left everyone feeling like they had a front row seat. The props and costumes were simple and well used to help tell the story. The set made brilliant use of their small space by having a rotating section of the stage that was used to change the main props. I think special mention should go to the lighting designer Alan Piotrowicz, I was impressed with how the use of light kept in step with the mood and I especially loved the maple tree he created with light and shadow. Being preview night there were a few missed lighting cues, and one sound issue but I am sure the team will fix those mistakes before opening night. Music was a fun element to the storyline, although the piano playing was transparently faked. Don’s (Morrie) dancing was entertaining and heartwarming to say the least. There was only one song sung in the play, and it was done by an unseen woman who had a beautiful voice. This was done in a way that fit well into the story. I loved this play and would recommend it to anyone. I felt it was moving, touching, and heartwarming. With good laughs and the issues talked about are the type that easily span many generations it makes this a great play for all adult ages. I felt the best thing about the play was the feeling of true love and friendship that Stephan and Don created between their characters; they had a real admiration and comfort level that I could feel from sitting in the audience. I was moved to tears watching Don (Morrie) struggle toward the end as his disease began to take hold; there were two points where he really delivered on the pain and frustration of ALS. Overall I wouldn’t have any suggestions for the writers or director, I found meaning and joy in every part of this play and enjoyed my night out.


 

Short and sweet, and short

I wasn't sure how they would adapt this play from the book. I think it was a decent attempt, but the play was short and I felt it missed major themes present in the book. My suggestion, buy the book and read it again rather than going to see this play.


 

Outstanding performances by Don and Stephan

Hadn't read the book but had read other Mitch Albom books so was anticipating an engaging story line. Don and Stephan were able to do just that - engage the audience this evening to where you could hear a pin drop. Fantastic job bringing this message to life for the audience! Bravo -


March 2011

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
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28
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7:30pm
11
8:00pm
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8:00pm
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2:00pm
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7:30pm
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8:00pm
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5:00pm
8:00pm
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2:00pm
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7:30pm
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8:00pm
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5:00pm
8:00pm
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2:00pm
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31
7:30pm
1
2

April 2011

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
27
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8:00pm
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5:00pm
8:00pm
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2:00pm
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Cast of Characters (In alphabetical order) 

Donald Devona….Morrie

Stephan Roselin…….Mitch

 

Production Team

Director……. Matt Daniels

Music Director……Donna Kummer

Technical Director/Scenic Designer……J. Michael Desper

Sound Engineer……Jan Pritzl

Lighting Designer……Alan Piotrowicz

Stage Manager……Erin Brophy

Scene Shop Coordinator……Pat Westen

 
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